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Salmon-watching Etiquette
  • Avoid disturbing spawning salmon.
  • Stay on trails.
  • Stay out of the stream, and keep your pets out as well.
  • Don't throw rocks or sticks at wild animals.
  • Stay off private property.
  • Don't block the road.
Maritime Heritage Park and the Whatcom Creek Trail
Views: Whatcom Creek
  • Chinook, coho and chum from October through December.
  • Pinks in August and September of odd years.
Fairhaven Park from the footbridge
Views: Padden Creek
  • Chum in November.
Arroyo Park from the footbridge
Views: Chuckanut Creek
  • Coho and chum from October through December.
Cornwall Park at the footbridges
Views: Squalicum Creek
  • Chum and coho, November and December.
Lynden City Park from the footbridge
Views: Fishtrap Creek
  • Coho, November and December.
Eagle Park off Truck Road
Views: Nooksack River
  • Coho and chum, November and December.
Parking area on North Fork Road, about 1.5 miles from Mosquito Lake Road
Views: Nooksack River
  • Chum, November and December.
Glacier Creek Road, a mile up and over a bridge
Views: Thompson Creek
  • Coho, October through January; this year, there won't be any until rain raises the creek level.
  • Pinks in September of odd years.
  • Steelhead and sea-run cutthroat trout, May and June.
Boyd Creek, three miles down Deadhorse Creek Road (Road 37) off Mt. Baker Highway, about a mile east of Glacier
Views: Boyd Creek
  • Coho, October through January; this year, there won't be any until rain raises the creek level.
  • Pinks in August and September of odd years.
  • Steelhead and sea-run cutthroat trout, May and June.
  • Chinook, August and September.



Q. How do salmon find their natal stream when returning to spawn?

A. Although adult salmon may travel thousands of miles from their natal streams during their life, they will use all their strength to return there to spawn. Some studies indicate that the distinctive smell of the natal stream is imprinted as fry emerge from eggs, and that adults follow their noses home. Other studies indicate that the brain of the salmon is sensitive to the earth’s magnetic field, and that this may be a factor in the homing instinct.

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